08 January 2022, by Victoria Séveno

In spite of a national fireworks ban imposed by the Dutch government, across the Netherlands around 10 million euros worth of damage was caused on New Year’s Eve. 

Millions of euros of damage caused on New Year’s Eve

According to Dutch insurance companies, the fireworks ban had little impact on the amount of damage caused by fireworks, announcing that the damage incurred on December 31, 2021, was similar to that of a “normal” New Year’s Eve. 

The Dutch Association of Insurers has announced that an estimated 10 million euros worth of damage was caused last weekend, significantly more than on December 31, 2020. “Due to the mild weather conditions, many people were out and about last year, and more (illegal) fireworks were set off than last year when there was also a ban,” explains director Richard Weurding.

Fires reported in Leiden, Utrecht, and Amsterdam

Insurance companies report 8 million euros worth of damage to housing, and a further 2 million euros worth of damage to cars and other vehicles – but say the total value of the damage incurred is certainly higher than 10 million. Insurers note that they don’t yet have a complete overview of the medical costs incurred and damage suffered by entrepreneurs

Various fires broke out across the country over New Year’s Eve, including at community centres in Leiden and Utrecht, and in Amsterdam there were several reports of cars and scooters set alight, while emergency services had to respond to a number of calls about fires in underground rubbish containers.

In addition to material damage, Dutch safety organisation SafetyNL reports that 773 fireworks-related injuries occurred on December 31,  double the number recorded on New Year’s Eve in 2020. Ahead of New Year’s celebrations, the Dutch police had said they wouldn’t enforce the national ban on fireworks.

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